Cristiano Tomás: /* Mexican period */

Mexican period


← Previous revision Revision as of 18:04, 31 March 2022
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===Mexican period===
===Mexican period===
[[File:José_María_Estudillo.jpg|thumb|right|upright|[[José María Estudillo]] served as commandant of the [[Presidio of San Diego]] and founded the [[Estudillo family of California]], a powerful San Diego clan of [[Californio]]s.]]
[[File:José_María_Estudillo.jpg|thumb|right|upright|[[José María Estudillo]] served as commandant of the [[Presidio of San Diego]] and founded the [[Estudillo family of California|Estudillo family]], a powerful San Diego clan of [[Californio]]s.]]
In 1821, [[Mexico]] [[Mexican War of Independence|won its independence from Spain]], and San Diego became part of the Mexican territory of [[Alta California]]. In 1822, Mexico began its attempt to extend its authority over the coastal territory of Alta California. The fort on Presidio Hill was gradually abandoned, while the town of San Diego grew up on the level land below Presidio Hill. The Mission was [[Mexican secularization act of 1833|secularized by the Mexican government in 1834]], and most of the Mission lands were granted to former soldiers. The 432 [[Vecino|residents]] of the town petitioned the governor to form a [[Cabildo (council)|pueblo]], and [[Juan María Osuna]] was elected the first ”[[alcalde]]” (“municipal magistrate”), defeating [[Pío Pico]] in the vote. Beyond the town, Mexican [[land grant]]s expanded the number of [[Ranchos of California|California ranchos]] that modestly added to the local economy. (See, ”[[List of pre-statehood mayors of San Diego]]”.) However, San Diego had been losing population throughout the 1830s, due to increasing tension between the settlers and the indigenous [[Kumeyaay]] and in 1838 the town lost its pueblo status because its size dropped to an estimated 100 to 150 residents.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/timeline/timeline1.htm|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151224204925/https://www.sandiegohistory.org/timeline/timeline1.htm|url-status=dead|archive-date=2015-12-24|title=Timeline of San Diego History {{!}} San Diego History Center|date=2015-12-24|access-date=2018-08-07}}</ref> The [[Ranchos of California|ranchos]] in the San Diego region would face Kumeyaay raids in the late 1830s and the town itself would face raids in the 1840s.<ref>Connolly, Mike. [https://www.kumeyaay.com/kumeyaay-the-mexican-period.html “Kumeyaay – The Mexican Period”. ”www.kumeyaay.com”.]</ref>
In 1821, [[Mexico]] [[Mexican War of Independence|won its independence from Spain]], and San Diego became part of the Mexican territory of [[Alta California]]. In 1822, Mexico began its attempt to extend its authority over the coastal territory of Alta California. The fort on Presidio Hill was gradually abandoned, while the town of San Diego grew up on the level land below Presidio Hill. The Mission was [[Mexican secularization act of 1833|secularized by the Mexican government in 1834]], and most of the Mission lands were granted to former soldiers. The 432 [[Vecino|residents]] of the town petitioned the governor to form a [[Cabildo (council)|pueblo]], and [[Juan María Osuna]] was elected the first ”[[alcalde]]” (“municipal magistrate”), defeating [[Pío Pico]] in the vote. Beyond the town, Mexican [[land grant]]s expanded the number of [[Ranchos of California|California ranchos]] that modestly added to the local economy. (See, ”[[List of pre-statehood mayors of San Diego]]”.) However, San Diego had been losing population throughout the 1830s, due to increasing tension between the settlers and the indigenous [[Kumeyaay]] and in 1838 the town lost its pueblo status because its size dropped to an estimated 100 to 150 residents.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/timeline/timeline1.htm|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20151224204925/https://www.sandiegohistory.org/timeline/timeline1.htm|url-status=dead|archive-date=2015-12-24|title=Timeline of San Diego History {{!}} San Diego History Center|date=2015-12-24|access-date=2018-08-07}}</ref> The [[Ranchos of California|ranchos]] in the San Diego region would face Kumeyaay raids in the late 1830s and the town itself would face raids in the 1840s.<ref>Connolly, Mike. [https://www.kumeyaay.com/kumeyaay-the-mexican-period.html “Kumeyaay – The Mexican Period”. ”www.kumeyaay.com”.]</ref>

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