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Rescuing 1 sources and tagging 0 as dead.) #IABot (v2.0.9.2


← Previous revision Revision as of 06:10, 4 October 2022
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===Spanish period===
===Spanish period===
[[File:San Diego de Alcalá, atribuido a Francisco Rizi (Museo Cerralbo, Madrid).jpg|thumb|left|upright|San Diego’s namesake is the 15th-century Spanish saint [[Didacus of Alcalá]].]]
[[File:San Diego de Alcalá, atribuido a Francisco Rizi (Museo Cerralbo, Madrid).jpg|thumb|left|upright|San Diego’s namesake is the 15th-century Spanish saint [[Didacus of Alcalá]].]]
The first European to visit the region was explorer [[Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo]], sailing under the flag of [[Crown of Castile|Castile]] but possibly [[Portuguese people|born in Portugal]]. Sailing his flagship ”San Salvador” from [[Barra de Navidad|Navidad]], New Spain, Cabrillo claimed the bay for the [[Spanish Empire]] in 1542, and named the site “San Miguel”.<ref>{{cite web|url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/bio/cabrillo/cabrillo.htm |title=San Diego Historical Society |publisher=Sandiegohistory.org |access-date=March 12, 2011}}</ref> In November 1602, [[Sebastián Vizcaíno]] was sent to map the California coast. Arriving on his flagship ”San Diego”, Vizcaíno surveyed the harbor and what are now [[Mission Bay, San Diego, California|Mission Bay]] and [[Point Loma]] and named the area for the Catholic [[Didacus of Alcalá|Saint Didacus]], a [[Spaniard]] more commonly known as ”San Diego de Alcalá”. On November 12, 1602, the first Christian religious service of record in [[Alta California]] was conducted by Friar Antonio de la Ascensión, a member of Vizcaíno’s expedition, to celebrate the feast day of San Diego.<ref>{{cite journal |last=Mills |first=James |title=San Diego…Where California Began |url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/67october/began.htm |date=October 1967 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20110614235048/https://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/67october/began.htm |archive-date=June 14, 2011 |journal=Journal of San Diego History |volume=13 |number=4 |access-date=February 17, 2017}}</ref>
The first European to visit the region was explorer [[Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo]], sailing under the flag of [[Crown of Castile|Castile]] but possibly [[Portuguese people|born in Portugal]]. Sailing his flagship ”San Salvador” from [[Barra de Navidad|Navidad]], New Spain, Cabrillo claimed the bay for the [[Spanish Empire]] in 1542, and named the site “San Miguel”.<ref>{{cite web |url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/bio/cabrillo/cabrillo.htm |title=San Diego Historical Society |publisher=Sandiegohistory.org |access-date=March 12, 2011 |archive-date=May 5, 2009 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20090505173316/http://www.sandiegohistory.org/bio/cabrillo/cabrillo.htm |url-status=dead }}</ref> In November 1602, [[Sebastián Vizcaíno]] was sent to map the California coast. Arriving on his flagship ”San Diego”, Vizcaíno surveyed the harbor and what are now [[Mission Bay, San Diego, California|Mission Bay]] and [[Point Loma]] and named the area for the Catholic [[Didacus of Alcalá|Saint Didacus]], a [[Spaniard]] more commonly known as ”San Diego de Alcalá”. On November 12, 1602, the first Christian religious service of record in [[Alta California]] was conducted by Friar Antonio de la Ascensión, a member of Vizcaíno’s expedition, to celebrate the feast day of San Diego.<ref>{{cite journal |last=Mills |first=James |title=San Diego…Where California Began |url=https://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/67october/began.htm |date=October 1967 |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20110614235048/https://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/67october/began.htm |archive-date=June 14, 2011 |journal=Journal of San Diego History |volume=13 |number=4 |access-date=February 17, 2017}}</ref>
The permanent [[European colonization of the Americas|European colonization]] of both California and San Diego began in 1769 with the arrival of four contingents of Spaniards from New Spain and the [[Baja California]] peninsula. Two seaborne parties reached San Diego Bay: the ”San Carlos”, under Vicente Vila and including as notable members the engineer and cartographer [[Miguel Costansó]] and the soldier and future governor [[Pedro Fages]], and the ”San Antonio”, under [[Juan José Pérez Hernández|Juan Pérez]]. An initial overland expedition to San Diego from the south was led by the soldier [[Fernando Rivera y Moncada|Fernando Rivera]] and included the [[Franciscan]] missionary, explorer, and chronicler [[Juan Crespí]], followed by a second party led by the designated governor [[Gaspar de Portolà]] and including the mission president (and now saint) [[Junípero Serra]].<ref>Pourade, Richard F. 1960. ”The History of San Diego: The Explorers”. Union-Tribune Publishing Company, San Diego.</ref>
The permanent [[European colonization of the Americas|European colonization]] of both California and San Diego began in 1769 with the arrival of four contingents of Spaniards from New Spain and the [[Baja California]] peninsula. Two seaborne parties reached San Diego Bay: the ”San Carlos”, under Vicente Vila and including as notable members the engineer and cartographer [[Miguel Costansó]] and the soldier and future governor [[Pedro Fages]], and the ”San Antonio”, under [[Juan José Pérez Hernández|Juan Pérez]]. An initial overland expedition to San Diego from the south was led by the soldier [[Fernando Rivera y Moncada|Fernando Rivera]] and included the [[Franciscan]] missionary, explorer, and chronicler [[Juan Crespí]], followed by a second party led by the designated governor [[Gaspar de Portolà]] and including the mission president (and now saint) [[Junípero Serra]].<ref>Pourade, Richard F. 1960. ”The History of San Diego: The Explorers”. Union-Tribune Publishing Company, San Diego.</ref>

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